ASLO Awards and Nominations

ASLO awards provide opportunities to recognize outstanding individual performance and to highlight accomplishments of the aquatic science research community. Please take the time to nominate your colleagues for these awards. Awards may be submitted via an online form. For further information, contact the appropriate subcommittee. Email contact addresses are provided below.

ASLO also offers two awards to students: Student Travel Awards, and Student Poster Awards. For more information, click here.

Nominations for ASLO awards can be made by any ASLO member, except co-authors of papers (Lindeman, Martin awards), ASLO Board members, or members of any award committee. Similarly, current ALSO Board members and award committee members may not provide supporting information for any nomination. As of 2013, candidates for ASLO awards are not required to be active members of ASLO.

Raymond L. Lindeman Award

Background

This annual award in honor of Raymond L. Lindeman (1915-1942) was first presented in 1987 to recognize an outstanding paper written by a young aquatic scientist. The initial gift to create a fund for the Lindeman award was made in 1986 by Lindeman's colleague in graduate school, Charles B. Reif of Wilkes College, PA, and a subsequent gift from Reif continues to support the award. Lindeman received his Ph.D. in March, 1941 from the University of Minnesota, and began postdoctoral work with G. Evelyn Hutchinson at Yale that September. His career was cut short by his death in April, 1942; he was only 27. The paper for which he is most remembered was published posthumously in 1942 (The trophic-dynamic aspect of ecology, Ecology 23: 399-418). The paper is the result of his thesis work on Cedar Creek Bog, Minnesota; he already had a draft version completed when he joined Hutchinson's lab. Hutchinson was instrumental in getting the paper accepted for publication (it was initially rejected by reviewers!). This paper has since become the foundation for research on the flow of energy in plant and animal communities. To learn more about Lindeman, read the biography of Lindeman by Bob Sterner in the May 2006 issue of the Limnology and Oceanography Bulletin.

Eligibility

This annual award recognizes an outstanding paper dealing with the aquatic sciences. Nominated papers must be written in English by an author who is no older than 35 years during the publication year. The paper must be published in a peer-reviewed journal two years before the award year (e.g., 2002 award will be presented for work published in 2000). The nominee must be first author if there is more than one author. Nominations may be made by any ASLO member, with the exception of the authors, or members of ASLO Executive, Board, or Award Committees.

Nominations Package

Nominations should include a copy of the paper and a brief letter of less than 500 words describing the impact of the paper on the field.

Award Recipients

James W. Ammerman (1987) for Ammerman, J.W. and F. Azam, 1985. Bacterial 5'-nucleotidase in aquatic ecosystems: A novel mechanism of phosphorus regeneration. Science 227:1338-1340.

Marlon R. Lewis (1988), for Lewis, M.R., W.G. Harrison, N.S. Oakey, D. Hebert, and T. Platt, 1986. Vertical Nitrate fluxes in the oligotrophic ocean. Science 234:870-873.

Cabell S. Davis III (1989) for Davis, C.S., 1987. Components of the zooplankton production cycle in the temperate ocean J. Mar. Res. 45:947-983.

James J. Elser (1990) for Elser, J.J., M.M. Elser, N.A. MacKay and S. R. Carpenter, 1988. Zooplankton-mediated transitions between N- and P-limited algal growth. Limnol. Oceanogr. 33:1-14.

Bart T. De Stasio, Jr. (1991) for De Stasio, B.T. Jr. 1989. The seed bank of a freshwater crustacean: Copepodology for the plant ecologist. Ecology 70:1377-1389.

Sherry L. Schiff (1992) for Schiff, S.L., R. Aravena, S.E. Trumbore and P.J. Dillon, 1990. Dissolved organic carbon cycling in forested watersheds: A carbon isotope approach. Water Resources Res. 26:2949-2957.

John R. Reinfelder (1993) for Reinfelder, J.R. and N.S. Fisher, 1991. The assimilation of elements ingested by marine copepods. Science 251:794-796.

David C. Smith (1994) for Smith, D.C., M. Simon, A. Alldredge and F. Azam, 1992. Intense hydrolytic enzyme activity on marine aggregates and implications for rapid particle dissolution. Nature 359:139-142.

Ulf Riebesell (1995) for Riebesell, U., D.A. Wolf-Gladrow and V. Smetacek, 1993. Carbon dioxide limitation of marine phytoplankton growth rates. Nature 361:249-251.

Deborah A. Bronk (1996) for Bronk, D.A., P.M. Glibert and B.B. Ward, 1994. Nitrogen uptake, dissolved organic nitrogen release, and new production. Science 265:1843-1846.

Christopher Freeman (1997) for Freeman, C. and M.A. Lock, 1995. The biofilm polysaccharide matrix: A buffer against changing organic substrate supply? Limnol. Oceanogr. 40(2):273-278.

Kathleen L. Laird (1998) for Laird, K.R., S.C. Fritz, Kirk A. Maasch and B.F. Cumming, 1996. Greater drought intensity and frequency before AD 1200 in the Northern Great Plains, USA. Nature 384:552-554.

Caceres, Carla E. (1999) for Caceres, C.E. 1997. Temporal variation, dormancy, and coexistence: A field test of the storage effect. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 94:9171-9175.

Dennis J. McGillicuddy (2000) for McGillicuddy Jr., D.J., A.R. Robinson, D.A. Siegel, H.W. Jannasch, R. Johnson, T.D. Dickey, J. McNeil, A. F. Michaels, and A.H. Knap. 1998. Influence of mesoscale eddies on new production in the Sargasso Sea. Nature; 394, 263-266.

Jennifer Cherrier (2001), for Cherrier, J., Bauer, J.E., Druffel, E.R.M., Coffin, R.B., and Chanton, J.P. 1999. Radiocarbon in marine Bacteria: evidence for the ages of assimilated carbon. Limnology and Oceanography. 44(3): 730-736

David M. Post (2002), for Post, D.M., M.L. Pace, and N.G. Hairston Jr. 2000. Ecosystem size determines food-chain length in lakes. Nature 405:1047-1049.

Jules M. Blais (2003), for Blais, J.M., D.W. Schindler, M. Sharp, E. Braekevelt, M. Lafreniere, K. McDonald, D.C.G. Muir, W.M.J. Strachan. 2001. Fluxes of semivolatile organochlorine compounds in Bow Lake, a high-altitude, glacier-fed, subalpine lake in the Canadian Rocky Mountains. Limnology and Oceanography 46:2019-2031.

William V. Sobczak (2004), for Sobczak, W.V., J.E. Cloern, A.D. Jassby, and A.Mueller-Solger. 2002. Bioavailability of organic matter in a highly disturbed estuary: The role of detrital and algal resources. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 99:8101-8105. PNAS 2002.

Kay D. Bidle (2005), for K.D. Bidle. 2002. Regulation of Oceanic Silicon and Carbon Preservation by Temperature Control on Bacteria. Science 298:1980-1984.

Leigh McCallister (2006), for McCallister, S.L., J.E. Bauer, J.E. Cherrier and H.W. Ducklow. 2004. Assessing sources and ages of organic matter supporting rive and estuarine bacterial production. Limnology and Oceanography, 49: 1687-1702.

Kelly M. Dorgan (2007) for Dorgan, K.M., P.A. Jumars, B. Johnson, B.P. Boudreau, and E. Landis. 2005. Burrowing by crack propagation through muddy sediment. Nature 433: 475.

Cornelia Wuchter (2008) for Wuchter C., et al. 2006. Archaeal nitrification in the ocean. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 103(33):12317-12322.

Alexandre Poulain (2009) for Poulain, A.J. et al. Potential for Mercury Reduction by Microbes in the High Arctic, Applied and Environmental Microbiology 73(7):2230-2238.

Roman Stocker (2010), for Stocker R., Seymour J. R., Samadani A., Hunt, D. E., and Polz, M. F. 2008. Rapid chemotactic response enables marine bacteria to exploit microscale nutrient patches. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 105: 4209-4214

William Durham (2011), for Durham, William M., J.O. Kessler and R. Stocker. 2009. Disruption of vertical motility by shear triggers formation of thin phytoplankton layers. Science 323: 1067-1070.

Stuart Jones (2012), for Jones, S.E. and Lennon, J.T. (2010) Dormancy contributes to the maintenance of microbial diversity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 107: 5881-5886

Jillian M. Petersen (2013), for her paper on hydrothermal vent symbioses, Petersen et al. 2011. Hydrogen is an energy source for hydrothermal vent symbioses. Nature 476,176–180.

Daniel J. Madigan (2014), for his paper Madigan, D.J., Z. Baumann and N.S. Fisher, Pacific bluefin tuna transport Fukushima-derived radionuclides from Japan to California, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 109(24):9483-9486.

G. Evelyn Hutchinson Award

Background

The G. Evelyn Hutchinson Award has been presented annually since 1982 to recognize excellence in any aspect of limnology or oceanography. The award is intended to symbolize the quality and innovations toward which the society strives and to remind its members of these goals. In lending his name to the award, Hutchinson asked that recipients be scientists who had made considerable contributions to knowledge, and whose future work promised a continuing legacy of scientific excellence.

Eligibility

Emphasis in selection will be given to mid-career scientists for work accomplished during the preceding 5-10 years. Preference will be given to candidates within 25 years of the receipt of their most advanced degree. Exceptional cases may be considered.

Nominations Package

Each nomination must be supported by a letter (not to exceed two pages) on qualifications. Ideally this letter should include statements that would form the basis of the citation and the presentation speech at the ASLO meeting. The nomination package may also include a list of important publications and other pertinent information, but in total this package shall be no more than 3 pages. The nomination should also be supported by 3 letters of endorsement of no more than 1 page each. These letters should indicate the breadth of support for the nominees and the perspectives of different individuals to clearly indicate the breadth of contributions of the nominee.

Award Recipients

Gene E. Likens (1982) A formal citation was not given for this first Award. Likens is best known for his long-term studies of acid rain, his long-term and collaborative research at Hubbard Brook on biogeochemical cycles in forested ecosystems, and for initiating and developing the Institute of Ecosystem Studies.

John E. Hobbie (1983) who has caused a revolution in our understanding of the importance of bacteria in natural waters, including the water column and the benthos, from ponds and lakes to estuaries and oceans.

Richard W. Eppley (1984) in recognition of contributions to our knowledge of the nitrogen and carbon cycles and plankton dynamics of the oceans.

David W. Schindler (1985) for excellence in the field of chemical limnology, contributions to research on whole lake systems, and outstanding service as Director of the Canadian Experimental Lakes Area.

Eville Gorham (1986) for his outstanding contributions to research in precipitation chemistry, limnology, and wetlands ecology.

Lawrence R. Pomeroy (1987) in recognition of his clear thinking and leadership in studies of phosphorus and microbes in estuaries and oceans.

Trevor Platt (1988) for outstanding contributions to developing the interface between the physics and biology of the ocean.

Daniel A. Livingstone (1989) for his excellent record of research in limnology, paleolimnology, and paleoecology, focusing chiefly on Africa, though with a substantial component of study in North America.

W. Thomas Edmondson (1990) in recognition of his work on aquatic population dynamics and community structure.

Richard C. Dugdale (1991) in recognition of his work on nutrient uptake kinetics and his introduction of the concept of "new" and regenerated primary production.

Robert G. Wetzel (1992) for studies of aquatic macrophytes,periphyton, and dissolved organic matter that have led to new understandings about the structure and function of lakes and wetland ecosystems.

Timothy R. Parsons (1993) in recognition of his achievements in combining chemistry with biology to make the ocean's ecology more predictable.

Peter A. Jumars (1994) for his outstanding work in biological oceanography, and particularly for his significant advances in understanding interactions among benthic organisms, sediments, and the physical environment.

Farooq Azam (1995) in recognition of his seminal contributions to our knowledge of fundamental processes in the sea, and particularly for his central role in the development of the concept of the "microbial loop".

Robert E. Hecky (1996) for outstanding contributions to the biogeochemistry of lakes and reservoirs in North America and Africa, and his leadership in collaborative research and syntheses across the basic-applied continuum.

Bess B. Ward (1997) for pioneering applications of molecular methods to key conversions of nitrogen and methane, connecting per-cell rates within defined taxa to integrated rates in the field.

David M. Karl (1998) for leadership in the fields of methods development, microbial ecology, molecular ecology and biogeochemistry, for analysis of whole ecosystems in the Pacific and Antarctic Oceans, and for exemplary teaching, mentoring and citizenship.

Stephen R. Carpenter (1999) in recognition of his work in blending experiment, comparative study, modeling and innovative statistical analysis to unravel the complex interactions among community characteristics and ecosystem functions and, in doing so, building important bridges between fundamental limnology and issues in lake management.

Paul Falkowski (2000), for his extensive contribution to understanding aquatic photosynthesis and nutrient uptake ranging from molecular mechanisms to global patterns of biogeochemical cycling.

Carlos M. Duarte (2001), for significant contributions to the ecology of aquatic vegetation as well as creative, paradigm-challenging research on planktonic primary and secondary production across a range of aquatic environments.

Louis Legendre (2002), for diverse contributions to quantification of aquatic ecological processes but in particular for cross-environment syntheses of hydrodynamic controls on phytoplankton production and carbon fluxes.

Hans W. Paerl (2003), for contributing to understanding of aquatic microbial processes; for documenting linkages among the atmospheric deposition of nitrogen, coastal eutrophication, and harmful algal blooms; and for crossing traditional research boundaries delineating organism- to system-level perspectives within freshwater, estuarine and marine ecosystems.

Bo Barker Jorgensen (2004), for outstanding contributions to the understanding of the biogeochemistry and microbial ecology of marine sediments, including development of new techniques, discovery of new organisms and metabolic pathways, and elucidation of the role of boundary layers; for the promotion of interdisciplinary approaches to benthic studies.

Mary E. Power (2005), for her ground-breaking, synthetic work on river food webs and community ecology and innovative use of large-scale experiments, for her work on coupling between ecosystems, and for her active role in conservation biology.

Jed A. Fuhrman (2006), for his development of the emergent field of microbial oceanography.

John P. Smol (2007) for outstanding contributions and leadership in bridging paleolimnology with limnology, ecology, and the environmental sciences, as well as his seminal work on polar limnology and environmental change.

Alice Alldredge (2008) for her work on marine snow which has and continues to revolutionize our understanding of particle flux and carbon cycling within the sea.

Michael Pace (2009), for sustained and outstanding contributions to understanding of vertical fluxes in lakes and oceans, trophic cascades in planktonic and microbial systems, assessment of comparative and experimental approaches in aquatic ecology, and synthesis of the status and future directions of ecosystem ecology.

Peter Dillon (2010), for his pioneering work in chemical limnology, including innovative research on eutrophication in lakes and long-term studies that have significantly advanced understanding of the responses of lakes and wetlands to acid deposition and climate change.

Cindy Lee (2011), for her pioneering work in the transformation of particles as they are formed and pass through the depths of the sea.

James Elser (2012), for his work on biological stoichiometry in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems and biota, and the use of evolutionary theory in understanding the organization from the molecule and cell to the ecosystem.

Curtis A. Suttle (2013), for his pioneering, transformative and multi-faceted work in the field of marine virology.

Gerhard Herndl (2014), for his exploration of microbial and biogeochemical processes in the dark ocean.

A.C. Redfield Lifetime Achievement Award

Background

The Lifetime Achievement Award was first presented in 1994 to recognize and honor major, long-term achievements in the fields of limnology and oceanography, including research, education and service to the community and society. In 2004, the ASLO Board renamed the Lifetime Achievement Award in honor of Alfred C. Redfield. Redfield's biography was compiled by Dr. Peter Williams, who received the Redfield Award in 2009, and published in the December 2006 issue of the Limnology and Oceanography Bulletin.

Eligibility

Emphasis in selection is given to established aquatic scientists whose work is recognized for its importance and long-term influence. Candidates should have more than 25 years experience beyond the date of their most advanced degree.

Nominations Package

Each nomination must be supported by a letter (not to exceed two pages) on qualifications. Ideally this letter should include statements that would form the basis of the citation and the presentation speech at the ASLO meeting. The nomination package may also include a list of important publications and other pertinent information, but in total this package shall be no more than 3 pages. The nomination should also be supported by 3 letters of endorsement of no more than 1 page each. These letters should indicate the breadth of support for the nominees and the perspectives of different individuals to clearly indicate the breadth of contributions of the nominee.

Award Recipients

Kenneth H. Mann (1994) in recognition of his significant achievements in the aquatic sciences, his contributions to the stature of these fields, and his role as a model for those at earlier career stages.

Clifford H. Mortimer (1995) in recognition of his lasting and substantive contributions across disciplines of aquatic biology, chemistry and physics, his leadership, and his general commitment to excellence.

Ruth Patrick (1996) for her outstanding contributions to aquatic ecology and environmental problem solving, her pioneering work on algae as indicators of water quality, and her leadership as an educator within and outside of academia.

Alan R. Longhurst (1997) in recognition of sustained excellence in the study of marine food webs and biogeography, and of outstanding leadership in the development of international collaboration and in the administration of world-renowned oceanographic programs.

Karl Banse (1998) for his prolific, diverse, and seminal papers on key oceanographic issues, rigorous application of the scientific method, high intellectual standards, and excellence in teaching.

Charles S. Yentsch (1999) for sustained and innovative contributions in the fields of phytoplankton pigments and productivity, optical properties and remote sensing, and for establishing and sustaining oceanographic initiatives and programs.

Ramon Margalef (2000) for his research and teaching on the subjects of plankton succession and the role of physical processes in structuring plankton communities that have guided the oceanography field for four decades.

Jack Vallentyne (2001), Freshwater Institute (CA) (Retired), for his exemplary research contributions in paleolimnology, biogeochemistry and eutrophication; outstanding administrative accomplishments in forming and fostering the Experimental Lakes Area; and passionate efforts in educating children in environmental, ecological and limnological issues.

John J. Magnuson (2002), Center for Limnology, University of Wisconsin-Madison (WI), for his extensive and effective service to the limnological and oceanographic communities, including leadership in national and international programs that have strengthened both science and policy, and for his seminal approaches to the community ecology of lakes and lake districts.

John J. Gilbert (2003), for developing and sustaining the field of rotifer ecology and biology; for successful mentorship for more than a quarter century; and for vital service contributions to the national and international communities of limnologists and oceanographers.

Charles R. Goldman (2004), for his enduring efforts to understand and protect Lake Tahoe, his inspiring mentorship of numerous students who themselves have made lasting scientific contributions, and for his tireless advocacy for limnological research, training and stewardship worldwide.

Andre Morel (2005), for leading our modern understanding of ocean color, particularly in Case 1 waters, where the optical properties are dominated by biology; and for fundamental work in the interpretation of satellite observations of ocean color.

Tom Fenchel (2006), for opening our eyes to the fascinating world of low Reynolds numbers and rapid diffusion and to the amazing adaptations of chemotactic and locomotive behaviour developed by protozoa and bacteria to life in a heterogenerous world.

Jörg Imberger (2007) for major contributions in physical limnology and particularly for fundamental insights into lake stratification and mixing dynamics through observational, theoretical and modeling studies.

John Hobbie (2008) for contributions in the field of aquatic microbial ecology and involvement with the development of important institutions and research programs.

Peter Williams (2009), for his outstanding contributions to our understanding of oceanic productivity, carbon cycling and metabolic balance and for his role in shaping current views on the importance of microbial processes in the oceans.

James F. Kitchell (2010), For field-changing contributions in the areas of fish ecology and fisheries, trophic dynamics, and understanding the role of fish in aquatic ecosystems.

Frederick Grassle (2011), in recognition of his fundamental discoveries in deep sea ecology, visionary leadership of marine sciences, selfless community service, and groundbreaking technical innovations that will shape oceanography for decades to come.

Winfried Lampert and Maciej Gliwicz (2012) in recognition of their outstanding individual and collaborative research, which has laid the foundations for our current understanding of phytoplankton-zooplankton interactions, trophic ecology of zooplankton, and evolutionary relationships in freshwater ecosystems.

Bruce J. Peterson (2013), for innovative and transformative studies of carbon, nutrient and water cycles at process, ecosystem and global scales.

Gene E. Likens (2014), for his extraordinary long-term contributions to the fields of limnology and oceanography–including research, education, and service within and beyond the aquatic sciences community.

John Martin Award

Background

The John Martin Award, established in 2005, recognizes a paper in aquatic sciences that is judged to have had a high impact on subsequent research in the field. The model for such a paper is Martin et al (1991), which laid out the case for iron limitation of phytoplankton productivity in the ocean. This award will be given to at most one paper per year. Unlike the Lindeman Award, which recognizes very recent papers (within 2 years) by young investigators, the Martin Award is for papers at least 10 years old.

Martin, JH, RM Gordon, and SE Fitzwater. 1991. The case for iron. Limnol. Oceanogr. 36:1793-1802

Eligibility

A nominated paper must be at least 10, but no more than 30 years old. It must be published in English and can be from any area of aquatic sciences. The spirit of the award is such that papers leading to fundamental shifts in research focus or interpretation of a large body of previous observations will be favored. In general, summarizing reviews and methods papers will not be favored.

Nominations Package

Nominations must include a copy of the paper and a brief letter of less than 500 words describing its impact. The latter may include a citation analysis, but this is not required. Nominations may be made by any ASLO member, with the exception of the authors, or members of ASLO Executive, Board, or Award Committees.

Criteria for judging the nominations

  1. As stated above, the spirit of the award is such that papers leading to fundamental shifts in research focus or interpretation of a large body of previous observations will be favored. In general, summarizing reviews and methods papers will not.
  2. A standing committee will judge nominations. The committee will vote once per year. To be chosen for the award, a nominated paper must be named on the ballots of all committee members. Each committee member may vote for a limited number of nominations, with this number to be determined by the committee annually, based on the number of nominated papers on the ballot [i.e. the larger the number of nominations, the greater the number of votes per committee member; otherwise you'd never get unanimity].
  3. A paper may be nominated no sooner than 10 years after it first appeared. Papers more than 30 years old will not be eligible.
  4. No more than one award may be given per year; if more than one paper are named on all ballots in a given year, a runoff vote will be held and the loser(s) will be returned to the nominating ballot to be considered in subsequent years.
  5. Nominated papers will stay on the ballot for three years or until unanimously approved for the award. After three years of consideration, papers not receiving the award will be removed from consideration. Nominated papers not receiving the award may be renominated as long as they remain eligible.

Other issues

The award is given to the paper. The lead author will be invited to accept the award and give a plenary talk at the ASLO meeting in the year following its receipt. If the lead author is unavailable, the second author accepts the award and gives the talk. If the lead author chooses, s/he may designate a co-author or the nominator to give the talk.

Award Recipients

2006: Azam, F., T. Fenchel, J.G. Field, S. Gray, L.A. Meyer-Reil, and F. Thingstad. 1983. The ecological role of water-column microbes in the sea. Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser. 10:257-263.

2007: Vannote, R. L., G.W. Minshall, K.W. Cummins, J. R. Sedell and C. E. Cushing. 1980. The river continuum concept. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Science 37: 130-137.

2008: Eppley, R. and B. Peterson. 1979. Particulate organic matter flux and planktonic new production in the deep ocean. Nature 282:677-680.

2009: Koehl, M. A. R., and J. R. Strickler. 1981. Copepod feeding currents: food capture at low Reynolds number. Limnol. Oceanogr. 26: 1062-1073.

2010: M.J.R. Fasham, H.W. Ducklow, and S.M. McKelvie. 1990. A nitrogen-based model of plankton dynamics in the oceanic mixed layer. Journal of Marine Research, 48: 591-639

2011: Øvind Bergh, Knut Yngve Borsheim, Gunnar Bratbak and Mikai Heldal. 1989. High Abundance of viruses found in Aquatic Environments. Nature 340:467-68

2012: Wanninkhof, R., 1992. Relationship between gas exchange and wind speed over the ocean. J. Geophys. Res. 97, 7373-7381.

2013: Val H. Smith, 1983. Low Nitrogen to Phosphorus Ratios Favor Dominance by Blue-Green Algae in Lake Phytoplankton. Science 221: 669-671.

2014: Li, W. K. W., D. V. Subba Rao, W. G. Harrison, J. C. Smith, J. J. Cullen, B. Irwin, and T. Platt. Autotrophic picoplankton in the tropical ocean. Science. 1983. 219:292-95.

Ruth Patrick Award

Background

In 1998, the Board initiated the Ruth Patrick Award, to honor outstanding research by a scientist in the application of basic aquatic science principles to the identification, analysis and/or solution of important environmental problems.

Eligibility

Emphasis on selection is given to aquatic scientists who have made either sustained contributions or a single, but critical contribution towards solving an environmental problem.

Nominations Package

Each nomination must be supported by a letter (not to exceed two pages) on qualifications. Nominations should provide evidence that the research has had an effect on the area of application. Ideally the nomination letter should include statements that would form the basis of the citation and the presentation speech at the ASLO meeting. The nomination package may also include a list of important publications and other pertinent information, but in total this package shall be no more than 3 pages. The nomination should also be supported by 3 letters of endorsement of no more than 1 page each. These letters should indicate the breadth of support for the nominees and the perspectives of different individuals to clearly indicate the breadth of contributions of the nominee. The endorsement letters may be mailed separately or be included in the nomination package. Please do not include a list of signatures.

Award Recipients

Edward D. Goldberg (1999) for sustained contributions to the identification and quantification of marine pollution, especially pollution involving radionuclides, trace metals, halogenated and petroleum hydrocarbons; for using basic research to address critical issues of human impacts upon marine ecosystems worldwide; and for integrating scientific information into public policy.

John Cairns, Jr. (2001), for his pioneering work in comprehensive ecosystem research and for outstanding applications of aquatic science in ecosystem recovery and restoration.

Claire L. Schelske (2003), for elucidating the biogeochemical consequences of cultural eutrophication in large lakes and developing a comprehensive understanding of the recovery of anthropogenically disturbed aquatic ecosystems.

Ellen R. M. Druffel (2004), for her sustained critical contributions on the composition and age of dissolved, particulate, and sedimentary carbon and for furthering the understanding of the processes governing the fate and distribution of oceanic carbon and the important role that the oceans play in global carbon flux.

David W. Schindler (2005), for his unfaltering record of doing revolutionary research in directions that, in hindsight, were the most important environmental problems of the time.

George W. Kling (2007), who has made a major contribution to our understanding of catastrophic lake degassing in Cameroon and for the last 20 years has tirelessly worked to implement the political and engineering solutions necessary to prevent a repetition of this catastrophe.

Nancy Rabalais (2008), for her unwavering commitment to creating a broad understanding of the dramatic expansion of coastal hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico and her courageous struggle for implementation of policies to reduce the size and effects of hypoxia.

Richard Batterbee (2009), for outstanding contributions to the reconstruction of environmental changes from biological and chemical records in lake sediments, information and techniques that are now in common use in assessing the environmental status of lakes, and have become critical tools for lake managers and policy makers.

Samuel N. Luoma (2010), for his passionate dedication to the solution of environmental problems in San Francisco Bay and his distinguished record of innovative research, leadership, and inspirational mentoring in trace metal ecotoxicology and water resource management.

John Downing (2011), for his outstanding efforts in aquatic ecology, eutrophication research, and environmental education.

Sallie W. "Penny" Chisholm and John J. Cullen (2012) for their significant contributions to the global community in their foresight and effective effort in addressing the environmental impacts of ocean iron fertilization which has led to high quality research on iron biogeochemistry and plankton dynamics as well as the development of key policies through the International Maritime Organization and UN Convention on Biodiversity.

Asit Mazumder (2013), for his contributions to solving water quality problems with sound limnological concepts.

Daniel Conley (2014), for his work on nutrient enrichment, eutrophication and the drastic expansion of hypoxia in coastal waters during the 20th century.

Ramón Margalef Award for Excellence in Education

Background

In 2008, the Board initiated a new award for Excellence in Education to recognize excellence in teaching and mentoring in the fields of limnology and oceanography. This award is targeted toward aquatic scientists at any stage in their careers and will be presented to the candidate who best exemplifies the highest standards of excellence in education. The Ramón Margalef Award for Excellence in Education was first presented in 2009 and will be presented annually. Margalef's biography was compiled by Dr. Francesc Peters and published in the March 2010 issue of the Limnology and Oceanography Bulletin.

Nominations

Each nomination must be supported by a letter (not to exceed two pages) describing the qualifications of the nominee. This letter should outline the aspects of the nominee's educational contributions that best demonstrate adherence to the highest standards of excellence in education at any level (undergraduate, graduate, collegial, or public). Nominations should also describe and present metrics used to demonstrate the impact of the nominee's contributions. These should surpass simple student evaluations or numbers of persons served but should show how the nominee's pedagogical work has led to broader and deeper understanding of limnology or oceanography by students, colleagues, or others. Ideally the nomination letter should include statements that would form the basis of the citation and the presentation speech at the ASLO meeting. The nomination should be supported by 3 letters of endorsement of no more than 1 page each. The supporting letters should indicate the breadth of support for the nominees and the perspectives of different individuals to clearly indicate the contributions of the nominees in all their areas of expertise.

Award Recipients

Benjamin Cuker (2009) for his outstanding teaching in the classroom, his exemplary and nationally-noted efforts to promote minority participation in aquatic sciences, and for being a gifted mentor. We truly have an outstanding and caring educator to be our first recipient of this important award.

C. Susan Weiler (2010), for her longstanding dedication to mentoring and educating the next generation of scholars in limnology and oceanography, and particularly for her visionary development of programs for newly graduated doctoral students.

Juan Gonzalez (2011), a tireless and remarkable educator who, during his long professional life has enriched the educational experiences of countless students and teachers of all ages.

John P. Smol (2012), for his outstanding work with educational duties of teaching undergraduate courses and mentoring graduate students.

Warwick F. Vincent (2013), for his devotion to teaching, which has never faded, and for his contagious passion, which is just as intense as in the very beginning, that together make him the best mentor a student could have.

Stanley I. Dodson (2014), an extraordinary educator who taught respect and awe for natural surroundings, the importance of observation, and appreciation for the process of learning.

Yentsch-Schindler Early Career Award

Background

In 2012, the Board initiated a new annual award in honor of early career scientists. The Yentsch-Schindler Early Career Award honors an aquatic scientist normally within 12 years of the completion of their terminal degree, for outstanding and balanced contributions to research, science training, and broader societal issues such as resource management, conservation, policy, and public education.

Nominations

Each nomination must be supported by a letter (not to exceed two pages) on qualifications. Ideally this letter should include statements that would form the basis of the citation and the presentation speech at the ASLO meeting. The nomination package may also include a list of important publications and other pertinent information, but in total this package shall be no more than 3 pages. In addition, the nomination package may include a statement that provides information on personal events that have influenced EC career achievements. These may include time required to have a family, deal with personal or family illness, do charity work, or be involved in political action.

The nomination should also be supported by 3 letters of endorsement of no more than 1 page each. These letters should indicate the breadth of support for the nominees and the perspectives of different individuals to clearly indicate the breadth of contributions of the nominee. You may provide the names and email addresses of individuals who have agreed to provide such letters. They will be contacted by email automatically upon submission of the nomination.

Award Recipients

Emily S. Bernhardt (2013), for her contributions in research on stream biogeochemistry and restoration, public policy on mountain-top mining, and graduate training in her early career.

Andrew J. Pershing (2014), for his work on fundamental and applied projects with a perspective ranging from the individual organism to the global scale, a truly integrative approach to environmental science.

Citation For Scientific Excellence

Background

This episodic award was initiated in 1987 to recognize members who could not fulfill their career potential because of early death or disability.

Nominations

Contact the ASLO President indicating the justification for the nomination and the names of those supporting it.

Previous Citations for Scientific Excellence

Carl J. Lorenzen (1987), in recognition of innovative and imaginative studies of phytoplankton pigments in the ocean

Peter Kilham (1990), in tribute for his many and significant contributions to aquatic science, in particular in the fields of biogeochemistry and African limnology, and in memory of intellectual enthusiasm and stimulation he always offered colleagues in the Society.

John H. Martin (1996), who has revolutionized our understanding of plankton rate processes, carbon cycling and the role of trace metals in regulating ecosystem structure, and whose work has stimulated some of the most significant findings of the last decade.

Robert H. Peters (1997) for his outstanding contributions to limnology in general and to phosphorus cycling in lakes in particular, and for his leadership in epistemological and philosophical thinking in the ecological sciences.

John I. Hedges (2003), for his many contributions to aquatic organic chemistry - particularly where oceans intersect the terrestrial world; for his stewardship as a long-time Associate Editor of Limnology and Oceanography; for his fine mentorship of many students and post-docs; and, for his ability to make us all enjoy science a bit more.

Thomas Frost (2008), for his contributions to the literature on freshwater sponges and the acidification of lakes, and for the unselfish attention that he devoted to helping others in science, providing advice, encouragement, and guidance.

Peter Verity (2011), who made valuable contributions in many areas of plankton ecology in his all too brief career.

Scott W. Nixon (2013), for his intellectual generosity and unending passion for marine science, mentorship, and protection of coastal ecosystems.

Victoria J. Bertics (2014), for her work on sediment biogeochemistry, in particular the interactions among animals, sediment, and microbes and the resulting impact on biogeochemical cycles.

Tommy and Yvette Edmondson Distinguished Service Award

Background

This award was initiated in 1993, to recognize members who have displayed exceptional efforts that support the professional goals and enhance the stature of ASLO. In 2009, the award was renamed the Tommy and Yvette Edmondson Distinguished Service Award, in recognition of their long and remarkable service to the society.

Nominations

Contact the ASLO President indicating the justification for the nomination and the names of those supporting it.

Previous Distinguished Service Award recipients

Benjamin E. Cuker (1993), in recognition of his efforts to increase the representation of minorities in the aquatic sciences.

Raelyn Cole (1996) for more than 30 years of service to the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, during which time [she] consistently maintained the highest technical standards possible for the journal Limnology and Oceanography.

John G. Stockner (1996) in appreciation of the outstanding and many years of service that he has provided to the Society.

Polly A. Penhale (1997) for her valuable ideas, insights and advice concerning society operations and programs, for fostering collaborations with other societies, and especially for developing annual and other meetings to bring together the full range of aquatic sciences.

Yvette H. Edmondson (1999) for establishing and maintaining Limnology and Oceanography as the premier journal in both disciplines during her long tenure as Editor, for maintaining exemplary standards while encouraging students and first-time authors, and for her many contributions to the Society.

Everett Fee (2001) for his many outstanding efforts as Editor of Limnology and Oceanography.

C. Susan Weiler (2007) for outstanding leadership in the professional development and mentoring of the next generation of aquatic scientists.

Peter Jumars (2008) for more than 27 years of service in all aspects of the society, including serving on committees and the ASLO Board, serving as Editor of Limnology and Oceanography, and representing ASLO on the Council of Scientific Society Presidents.

Paul Kemp and Susana Feng (2009), for creating, maintaining, and enhancing the ubiquitous web presence of ASLO; for launching and building L&O: Methods into a respected journal; and for their extensive, unremunerated contributions to the modern face and function of ASLO.

Helen Schneider Lemay and the Schneider Group, Inc. (2011), for extraordinary service in support of ASLO members, the operation of the ASLO Board of Directors, and the implementation of ASLO projects and strategic plan. Their outstanding service has rendered Helen Schneider and The Schneider Group a pillar and a symbol of the healthy scientific society they have contributed to develop.